Tag Archives: job search

Email Etiquette for Job Seekers

This Post was written by Bridge Technical Talent
Date posted: August 13, 2018

 

Source: https://pixabay.com/en/notebook-work-girl-computer-woman-2386034/

Emails are one of the most common types of communication in many workplaces, beginning with the job search. However, many people may not know exactly how they can portray themselves professionally through an email. Emails are often the first point of communication during a job search, so it is important that they are written thoughtfully and purposefully. To make the right first impression when sending an email, it is important that you keep these tips in mind.  Continue reading

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Twitter Chat Recap: Discussing Resume Tips with Workopolis

This Post was written by Bridge Technical Talent
Date posted: March 23, 2018

At the start of the month, we took part in a Twitter chat with Workopolis, a Canadian-based job search site. Each month they host a Twitter chat where HR experts, job seekers, and other professionals join in to discuss the job search.  As “hiring season” approaches, now is a great time to review your resume and update a few sections where necessary. We’re highlighting moments from this month’s discussion on resume tips:

What, in your opinion, is the biggest resume mistake?

As you can imagine, the majority of participants cited typos as the biggest resume mistake. Typos and grammatical errors are the easiest mistakes to fix, so if they are there it shows a lack of attention to detail.

What’s your best resume writing tip?

What are some overused words on a resume (and what can you use instead)?

We were very intrigued by this question. It’s easy to become caught up with trying to look your best, but words like “hard worker” and “results oriented” are far too overused. As one participant put it, your resume should show those qualities, you shouldn’t have to spell it out. Avoid “I” statements and use action verbs to describe the work you’ve done.

How do you know if your resume is too long?

The general consensus concluded that two pages is the absolute limit. Unless you’re in the academic field or something else that requires extensive, detailed work experience, don’t go over two pages. One effective page is ideal.

What are some creative resume ideas?

Do you think including hobbies and interests can help you stand out?

Many people struggle with this question. Some resources suggest adding hobbies, while others say it detracts from your professional accomplishments. As long as you include subjects that are directly related to your field and could potentially lead to conversations about your specific skills, it’s okay to include.

If you’d like to take part in the #Workopolis chat, join us next month! Stay tuned for the topic of the April 4th discussion.

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Making the Most from a Networking Event

This Post was written by Bridge Technical Talent
Date posted: September 8, 2017

Image courtesy of TheInfiniteActuary

Networking events are essential for career development and business opportunities. Whether you need to find a job, connect with certain employees or companies, or desire to collaborate on a project, networking events can facilitate your professional growth. Since it can connect you with the right people, it’s important to approach networking seriously and make the most of it. Here are six networking event tips how:

1. Be prepared
You’re going to meet people, so it’s best to be prepared to talk about who you are, what you do, and what you’re looking for. You won’t look very professional if you’re stumbling over your words or taking too long to respond to a question. Be ready to discuss your career, aspirations, and experiences. Don’t forget to bring your resume if you’re looking to get hired, or your business cards if you need to distribute your contact information.

2. Find a way to stand out
You certainly won’t be the only person that the people at a networking event will talk to. Everyone will mingle throughout the evening and possibly have conversations with dozens of others at these events. Whether it’s finding a common interest with someone, sending a follow-up email within a few days, or having a firm handshake, it’s important for you to positively stand out to this person so that the people you connected with don’t forget you.

3. Ask good questions
Asking questions is beneficial not only because it’ll help you better understand a person or organization, but also because it’s the backbone of networking conversations. These conversations are fueled by inquiries, so try to ask the right questions when appropriate. It may help to do a little homework about a person or the company he or she works for beforehand. Try making a list of potential questions you could ask others before attending a networking event, that way you feel prepared.

4. Dress like a professional
You don’t have to dress like you’re going into an interview, but do everyone a favor and leave your oversized suit at home. Remember, you’ll be making a lot of first impressions when you’re networking. Make sure to have a clean overall appearance, and, just like in interviews, avoid wearing perfume or cologne. Keep your business cards in an easily accessible places. After all, you don’t want your new acquaintances watching you digging through piles of rubble in your bag.

5. Have a goal in mind
Don’t go to a networking event blindly. Ask yourself beforehand what you want to accomplish from meeting certain people. Looking for job opportunities? Have an elevator pitch memorized.  Trying to collaborate on projects? Be ready to explain what you have to offer to their team. When you meet people, think of how they can help you carry out your plans and act accordingly.

6. Don’t forget your manners
It may be tempting to look around for an exit when you’re in a dead conversation, but remember to maintain a level of professionalism. When someone is talking, listen. If you want to end the conversation, end it politely rather than abruptly. Remember to ask just as many questions as you have answered. You don’t want to burn bridges with potential connections within the first five minutes of meeting them.

Networking is a powerful way to expand your professional connections and you should always take advantage of the opportunity to build your contacts. Understanding the right ways to prepare for them can help you set yourself apart from everyone else.

How do you approach networking events? Let us know on Twitter and LinkedIn! Follow us on our website to search open tech roles that might be a great fit for you.

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Effective Onboarding: Tips for Retaining Talent

This Post was written by Darcy Uustal
Date posted: August 30, 2017

The hiring process can be time consuming, cumbersome, and expensive, which is why you want this process to be as smooth as possible. The more effective your onboarding, the more likely you are to retain your talent for the long run. Take the time to reexamine your onboarding process and consider these simple changes that are easy to make. Keep these tips in mind to ensure your onboarding process is effective for both you and your employees.

Give them a warm welcome
Your new hires have just made an important life decision to join your company, so always make sure they feel welcome! A nice welcome email before they start, including some of the key team members they will be working with, is a nice touch. Naturally, you’ll be showing them around the office, but don’t forget to personally introduce them to their coworkers.

Provide them with the proper resources
You can’t do your job effectively when you don’t have the right equipment, and neither can your employees. Double check that all badges, laptops, passwords, and network access is set up before their first day. It’s also a nice touch to make sure their desk/office is clean and prepared for them to settle into. A nice ‘welcome to the company’ sign in their working space goes a long way!

Pair them with a mentor
If possible, pair your new hire with one of their peers who performs well and has shown strong leadership skills. When they are with someone who already knows the ins and outs of the job they will feel more confident asking questions and adjusting to their new role. You can also check in with their partner to see if they are doing well. This also keeps more seasoned employees engaged and lets them know you see them as senior staff and a mentor.

Provide educational opportunities
Initial training is always necessary, but educational opportunities should not disappear after that. Employees will avoid stagnation and feel more productive if they have the ability to take part in career development programs. Offering training opportunities is important during onboarding and should continue throughout employment.

Schedule regular check-ins
In addition to a 30-60-90 day review, try setting up a time to meet with your new hire once a week. Maybe you sit down with them one-on-one every Monday to review upcoming tasks to have them summarize what they have been working on. If you can’t commit to a one-on-one once a week, set a meeting up twice per month. The important piece is keeping the scheduled time together. Doing so will help your new employee feel supported and more open to asking questions, but most importantly it shows them that you care about how they feel in their new position.

Tweaking your onboarding process can make the difference between your newest hires staying or leaving. Feeling supported in a new role, and maintain that support is key. How does your company welcome new employees to the team?

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